Posts Tagged ‘Leblon’

ON APRIL 11TH 2013 CACHAÇA COMES INTO ITS OWN

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

Today the TTB Amends the Distilled Spirits Identity Regulations to Recognize “Cachaça” as a Type of Rum and Distinctive Product of Brazil

We’ll be getting you more details on this breaking story shortly, but first we are just so THRILLED to announce, in short, that as of today you can expect to see Cachaça labeled here in the US as Cachaça; and not just as “Brazilian Rum.”

Brands like Leblon (www.leblon.com) who had a significant part in bringing this new legislation to life, as well as fledgling brands like Avua (www.avuacachaca.com) and Cabana (www.cabanacachaca.com,) and all others in between, are going to benefit from this new designation.

Below are the facts from Washington. Stay tuned for more on actual impact.

Washington, D.C. — On February 25, 2013, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade
Bureau (TTB) will publish a final rule in the Federal Register amending its regulations
regarding the standards of identity for distilled spirits to recognize “Cachaça” as a type
of rum and as a distinctive product of Brazil. This final rule will be effective on April 11,
2013.

TTB first undertook this rulemaking in response to a petition from the Government of
Brazil, which requested that the United States recognize Cachaça as a distinctive
product of Brazil. Following discussions among officials of Brazil, the Office of the
United States Trade Representative, and TTB, representatives of Brazil and the United
States signed an agreement on April 9, 2012, under which the United States would
recognize Cachaça as a distinctive product of Brazil, and, in turn, Brazil would, within 30
days, recognize Bourbon Whiskey and Tennessee Whiskey as distinctive products of
the United States.

Under Brazilian law, “Cachaça” is a Brazilian distilled spirits product with an alcohol
content of 38 to 48 percent by volume at 20 degrees Celsius, obtained from the
distillation of the fermented must of sugar cane. In the United States, previous to the
effective date of this final rule, TTB classified Cachaça products as rums under its
distilled spirits standards of identity regulations at 27 CFR 5.22(f).
In a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on April 30, 2012, TTB proposed to
amend 27 CFR 5.22(f) to recognize Cachaça as a type within the class designation
“rum” that would be recognized as a distinctive product of Brazil made in compliance
with Brazilian laws. Thus, under TTB’s proposal, a qualifying product may simply be
labeled as “Cachaça” without the term “rum” on the label (just as a product labeled with
the type designation “Cognac” is not required to also bear the class designation
“brandy”).

While the Brazilian standard allows products designated as Cachaça to have an alcohol
content ranging from 38 to 48 percent alcohol by volume, the United States standard
requires that rum be bottled at not less than 40 percent alcohol by volume, or 80
degrees proof. Therefore, any “Cachaça” imported into the United States will have to
conform to this minimum bottling proof requirement. A product that is bottled at below
40 percent alcohol by volume will fall outside the type designation for Cachaça, but,
depending on the product’s manufacturing method, the product could be labeled as a
“diluted Cachaça” or a distilled spirits specialty product bearing a statement of
composition. The “Cachaça” type description also will not allow any spirits that use corn
or corn syrup in the fermentation process to be labeled as Cachaça. In addition, the
amended regulation will allow the word “Cachaça” to be spelled with or without the
diacritic mark (i.e., “Cachaça” or “Cachaca”). Finally, the regulation contains a 180-day
transition period during which producers may continue to use previously approved
“Cachaça” labels for products that do not conform to the new Cachaça standard of
identity at 27 CFR 5.22(f)(1).

To view the complete rulemaking record regarding this regulatory amendment, including
the Brazilian petition, the proposed rule (Notice No. 127), the public comments received
in response to the proposed rule, and the final rule (T.D. TTB–112) once it is published,
see Docket No. TTB–2012–0002 at the “Regulations.gov” website
(www.regulations.gov).

LOVING A LIQUID 2013

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

What you’ll be drinking and thinking about and why, as 2013 marches on
By Francine Cohen

Argentina cars old and new

The past and the present can, and do, exist peacefully side by side. The best elements from eras past stick around to inform the future, while new innovations take their rightful place alongside of them.
Just as it is evident in automobile design, the same can be said of the beverage world. Great old drinks become classics, while new innovations and approaches are embraced with open arms. What does this have to do with drinks and the new year, versus the one just past?

Whether we’re talking about the specifics of the last months of 2012, or just in general about year end, it’s often such a pressure filled time. We’re scrambling to get all those things done we’d promised ourselves, or others, that we’d do and swearing we’ll be better next year. Which brings us to the new year; again, pressure filled, but full of hope for a brighter tomorrow, and new ideas and experiences ahead that promise to make (insert year here) the Best Year Ever.

Realistic? Probably not. We’d all be a whole lot better off, calmer, happier, and more productive if we stopped with the pressure and just focused on doing the best we could every day and finding a little joy in every new discovery instead of awaiting The Big One. Alas, that’s not realistic either.

What could work is just a little proverbial jumping up and down over the trends we’ve seen bubbling up in the drinks industry. At INSIDE F&B we’ve been hearing rumbles about a lot of things, and have the good fortune to be first out of the gate in trying on some of these ideas for size while tasting new products. There are a lot of ideas on the horizon and overall the spirits industry is booming in terms of brand explosion and job opportunities. In the category of new drink ideas some are good, some a little less than appealing; for instance, who are we to stop you from drinking chocolate wine if that’s what you want. Just don’t try and serve it to us. But if someone can make a living from this, and not really hurt anyone in the process, we’re okay with that.

Here’s what we expect to see more of in 2013:
1) Savory. No, don’t expect salt in every cocktail (although a bartender worth his/her salt knows the impact it’ll have to add a scant pinch); but do know that as the bar and kitchen become more comfortable partners food flavors are going to start creeping into our cocktail glasses more often than they have in the past.
2) Texture. Yep, back to the kitchen again. While we’re not sure that chunky bits in our cocktails are what we’re looking for on a regular basis, the judicious use of ice, garnishes, and understanding that ingredients impact mouth feel will enhance the cocktail experience.
3) Sour. Vinegars were popping for a hot minute. We don’t think we’ve seen the end of this. Especially as more bartenders start substituting vinegars for other acid in drinks.
4) International sugar and salt options. Want to use Brazilian rapadura

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TODAY’S MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE: “DON’T HATE US BECAUSE WE’RE BEAUTIFUL!”

Monday, July 4th, 2011

>Does Bottle Design Complement or Compete with Spirit Quality?
By Kathleen Reynolds, KReyRecommends.com

www.skinnygirlcocktails.com) has warranted disdain from countless spirits professionals – and raked in thousands for its creator. Beyond the media-saturated spokesperson and mass-friendly pricing, there is no denying the level of awareness behind the SkinnyGirl brand, which is clearly represented on every bottle. And it begs the question: when it comes to wine and spirits – do looks really matter?

The short answer? Yes. Of course. A number of bartenders and spirits professionals interviewed insisted looks have little to no bearing on their preferences. Most would opt for austere design if it came with a superior spirit. But they recognize that consumers buy with their eyes. And if it really didn’t matter, companies would not invest in a bottle’s looks or labels. The truth is, a modern meal isn’t complete without creative plating and most imbibers are eyeing bottles like they would book covers or eHarmony photos. They want the spirit to speak to them before the first sip. But there’s a fine line between whetting the palette over-promising on looks while disappointing on taste.

Marketers can go through elaborate measures to ensure their end product is consistent with their brand’s core. For Leblon USA (www.lebloncachaca.com), a premium, small batch cachaça that’s been on the market since 2005, the bottle was designed with an internal mantra in mind, according to Steve Luttman, President and Founder. “We’re always thinking about S.N.T. – sensual, natural, together.” Luttman wants anyone who sees his product to feel they could “travel to Rio in a bottle.” According to him, “When you’re selling spirits, you’re selling a cheap plane ticket.” Everything from the exotic font used, to the mountain landscape in the background, to the carefully-selected lime green colors, is intended to transport a person to Brazil’s famous beaches. The creative process began in Luttman’s mind, and its remnants remain on his office wall five years later to keep him focused. After writing the central concept, Luttman created an idea board and mocked up a basic logo. From there, he consulted with Paul McDowell Design to turn his vision into reality. They tested prototypes with consumers and industry professionals along the way, and have not veered from the initial design since launching five years ago.

How does Luttman know it’s effective? He describes honing his sales pitch and to avoid launching into a hard sell right away. “I just put the bottle on the bar, and it immediately generates a response and starts the conversation. He recognizes that bottle design only goes so far. “Looks just get us in the door. The juice has to speak for itself. If it doesn’t, we’re screwed.”

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WHOLE LOTTA SHAKING GOING ON

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

New York Loves Japan Punch Party Fundraiser
By Francine Cohen


First an earthquake, followed by a tsunami, followed by another earthquake and expected aftershocks. Japan can’t catch a break.

But you can take a break from your regular Monday night cocktail routine and put that money to good use. Not to worry; we’re not suggesting you stop sipping. Instead we think you should be sipping Japanese inspired punches at Summit Bar.

$20 gets you unlimited access to punch bowls filled with hand crafted concoctions created by New York’s best bar chefs. Punches on the bar will includ Beefeater Gin, Belvedere Vodka, Corazon Tequila, Leblon Cachca, Pernod Absinthe, Sailor Jerry Rum, and the Classic & Vintage Spirits portfolio (presented by The Tippling Bros.). Ladle up your cup to the beats DJ Kimiko Masuda will be spinning or ask the bar staff for a Yamazaki cocktail and know you’re drinking for an important cause.

100% of the proceeds got the Japan Society’s Earthquake Relief Fund. To RSVP see
www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=113541028725371 and for more information go to www.thesummitbar.net.

THE SOUL OF BRAZIL

Monday, June 28th, 2010

By Ted Henwood Photos courtesy of Leblon

A last-minute email inspired me to purchase a ticket to the inaugural Gourmet Latino Festival that kicked off June in New York, offering a slew of experiences in Latin-inspired foodie-fun. Over the course of the weekend long festival 40 gifted chefs and a horde of highly regarded drink-makers huddled together to celebrate the culture and gastronomy of Latin America. Levantameurtos (awaken the dead) Foods & Cocktails, a brunch celebrating regional Mexican dishes paired with morning cocktails, was my first choice (morning drinks — right on). It was such a delight that it inspired me to stick around and poke my greedy snout into the next room for a tasting seminar on Brazilian food and cocktails.

Upon entering, my nose was struck by the wafting scent of culinary delights that author and chef Leticia Moreino-Schwartz had created to entice us. The most amazing was her Pão de Queijo, which I might shamefully describe as a cheesy, delicate, chewy, non-greasy, tiny-and-cute Hushpuppy. An apparent staple in Brazil, this little bun has been obviously perfected by her.

The seminar commenced with speaker Olie Berlic, the un-official Ambassador of Brazilian Rum, as he fired on all cylinders raging about his favorite white liquor. His commitment to leave a permanent impression and convert many to his devotion for this Latin spirit was truly infectious.

And thus, armed with Olie’s inspired spiel and a belly full Leticia’s Pão de Queijo, I now stand ready to talk Brazilian Rum…and what first must be declared: Brazilian rum does not exist!

Ok, “Brazilian Rum” exists, but merely as a legal term created by the American government to categorize a South American spirit. Well, maybe another government somewhere on our globe makes the same gaffe, but, according to Olie, Brazilian Rum does not exist in Brazil. Why? Because in South America’s largest country (and the only Portuguese speaking country in all the Americas) the spirit that is distilled purely from the fermented juice of fresh pressed cane is called — Cachaça!

And Brazil loves its Cachaça. Loves it so darn much, that it ranks

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LEBLON BRAZILLIONAIRE IS WSWA’S TOP LIBATION

Thursday, May 6th, 2010

Tobin Ellis’ Cachaça-Driven Tipple Wins Hearts and Palates at Beverage Tradeshow
By Francine Cohen Photos Courtesy of Leblon

Keynote speaker Sarah Palin couldn’t hold WSWA (www.wswa.org) attendees’ attention like Tobin Ellis (www.barmagic.com) did when he introduced his award winning drink, The Brazillionaire, at the show’s first ever libation challenge.

Ellis’ cocktail, which features Leblon cachaça (made of pressed sugar cane that then rests in XO cognac casks) was named “Judges Choice” Winner at the First Annual WSWA Call for Cocktails: Mixology Competition held at the 67th Annual Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America (WSWA) Convention in Las Vegas on April 8, 2010.

BarMagic Principal Tobin Ellis has 20 years of bartending, hospitality, and nightlife experience. Currently running the wildly popular Social Mixology industry event, Ellis began training bartenders in 1991 and also spent six years in advertising in New York and Washington, D.C. A former President of the Flair Bartenders’ Association, Head Bartender for Caesars Palace (Las Vegas), NSO Bar Trainer for TGI Friday’s, Ellis is a 3-time Mixology Champion (2009 USBG Leblon Caipirinha Competition, 2009 Tales of the Cocktail Barmade Bitters Winner, 2005 Blue Blazer Mixology Champion) and a 9-Time World Finalist in competition (Legends, Quest, Best in the West, Blue Blazer, Cayman Masters). Ellis has organized and judged bartending competitions of all styles all over the world since 1997 and has served as a technical advisor and judge for a number of television networks, including A&E, Travel Channel, Food Network and NBC.

His winning cocktail combined Leblon Cachaça (www.leblon.com), Cherry Heering (www.cherryheering.com), Perfect Purée of Napa Valley passion fruit purée (www.perfectpuree.com), fresh lime sour,

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WHY THE BAR SHOULD LOVE THE KITCHEN

Sunday, March 14th, 2010

Story and Photos by Joe DiStefano

Tools of the Trade

“The Bar Loves the Kitchen” seminars recently held at the International Food & Restaurant Show (www.internationalrestaurantny.com) brought together top mixologists, bartenders, and industry experts to discuss a simple yet powerful idea: a closer relationship between the bar and the kitchen leads to cost savings and more efficient sourcing strategies all while enhancing the guest experience.

Jason Littrell Muddles It Up A Bit

“The concept behind bar loves the kitchen is really about crossover between what happens in the kitchen and the back of the house and what happens in the front of the house and the bar,” said Francine Cohen, Editor in Chief of INSIDE F&B (www.insidefandb.com), who designed and hosted the seminars. “A lot of restaurants don’t take advantage of what’s happening back in their kitchen, they don’t think about how items like oranges and lemons can be ordered just once and used in both arenas.

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SPIRITED SEMINARS

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Culinary and cocktails intersect at the Restaurant Show
By Francine Cohen

Photo by Jennifer Mitchell/Courtesy of Beam Global

Mixing it up at The International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York’s beverage seminars February 28th through March 2nd at The Javits Center (www.internationalrestaurantny.com) – Marcy Blum, Jonathan Forester, Chef Carmen Gonzalez, Jason Littrell, James Menite, Heidi and Junior Merino, Douglass Miller, Raphael Reyes, and Erin Williams.

Join these beverage, culinary, and special event luminaries and you’ll learn how to maximize operational efficiencies and enhance the guest experience through an integrated and thoughtful beverage program approach that is effective both in restaurants and for special events.

Bar Loves The Kitchen: Culinary Cocktails (a hands-on/interactive demo) Demo Theater/Booth 1957
Sunday, February 28, 2010 12:00 – 12:45 pm
Monday, March 1, 2010 3:15 – 4:00 pm

Creating Signature Cocktails For Your Clients
Tuesday, March 2, 2010 10:00 – 11:00 AM Room 1C01

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