Posts Tagged ‘management practices’

MANAGING EXPECTATIONS

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

By Michael Neff

Hospitality as a business is unique, in that anyone who throws a decent dinner-party or mixes cocktails in their kitchen thinks at some point that they have what it takes to work enter the field as a fully-formed professional. I love to cook, and all my friends think I should open a restaurant. Oh, yeah? I can use a calculator, but that doesn’t mean you want me keeping your books.

Building a meal, and running a profitable establishment are two very different beasts. Of all the skills necessary to run a restaurant or bar, the hardest to learn and most important to eventual success is effective management. A good manager is worth her weight in gold, and can be the difference between a fulfilled staff who knows their business, and a sign in the window that reads, “Restaurant for Lease.”

There are many paths that can lead you in to the service business. You can start from the bottom and work your way up. You can go to a school of some sort, which only really works for back-of-house, as I know of no “Waiting Table School” and the bartending schools I’ve seen aren’t worth the time it takes to retrain its graduates. These days, you can apprentice, an option that didn’t really exist until fairly recently.

Or you can do what I did, and lie.

After many years in the business, I don’t recommend the latter course for most people. You’re almost always found out, and end up in a less favorable position than if you had been honest from the beginning and fessed up that you don’t know what you’re doing. Waiting tables takes a lot of skill, as does effectively bussing, hosting, and bartending. It’s very difficult to fake your way through the early stages of these jobs without causing yourself, your bar, and your clientele a fair amount of grief.

I am now not only established as a career bartender, but I own two bars of my own; one of which boasts a fifty-seat dining room. While I had worked for years to perfect the craft of tending bar, when my partners and I opened our first place over two years ago, I realized that the biggest aspect of the hospitality business that I had neglected was management. Sure, I could run a bar, write a schedule, order for the week, and make sure that the lights are turned on and off at the appropriate time, but there was always a point where a problem occurred that required the voice of someone in a higher pay-grade.

Now we are the ones getting phone calls at 3 am when half the power goes out. We have to figure out what to do when the sixty-person party on a Friday night becomes seventy-five. There is no higher pay-grade, so we are called to deal with everything from accountants to plumbers to event-planning. It’s difficult and stressful, and I now have a lot more compassion for

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I’VE GOT YOUR BACK

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Making the right management choices
By Patrick Maguire

Business owners and managers talk a big game when it comes to supporting their employees, but unfortunately, many of them cower during moments of truth when customers are dead wrong. Smart leaders treasure great employees because they are much more valuable than horrific customers.

Workers who have left their jobs consistently tell me their departures stemmed from superiors who failed to support them in the face of encounters with out-of-control customers. Neither money nor lack of advancement led them to quit. They departed environments plagued by low morale, distrust, and weak management.

In addition to being poor leaders, a lot of owners and managers operate without a crisis management plan, leaving them unprepared when unruly customers act out. Many of them simply don’t know how to respond to inappropriate customers. Competent leaders, however, consistently train, rehearse, and role-play scenarios to ensure their readiness for circumstances requiring courage, confidence and decisive action.

Retaining top employees requires strong leadership. When weak leadership persists, quality employees seek greener pastures. When you (owners/manangers) enable and cater to abusive customers at the expense of staff, here is what you lose:

1. Credibility with your employees and other customers: Abusive, sexist, racist, condescending,

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