Posts Tagged ‘Anthony Bourdain’

WHAT’S IN A PLATE (OF STREET FOOD)?

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

By Jessica Colley

Photo by Melissa Hom

Photo by Melissa Hom

When K.F. Seetoh looks at a plate of satay, he doesn’t just see culturally expressive, delicious food—he sees opportunities.

This perspective sparked the conception of the World Street Food Congress, a 10-day celebration of vibrant street food culture around the globe. Chefs, restaurateurs, and food enthusiasts will gather for the inaugural event in Singapore from May 31 through June 9, 2013 to feast, jumpstart a dialogue on the impact of street food on jobs, society, and education, and honor talented street food artisans through an awards ceremony.

“What do chefs like to eat?” Anthony Bourdain asked recently at a press conference announcing details on the first-ever World Street Food Congress. “There is a gravity that pushes chefs towards street food. Every bite tells you something about who cooked it and where they come from.” Bourdain is an enthusiastic voice in the World Street Food Council, along with James Oseland, Editor-in-Chief of Saveur, Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Chef and Owner of Spice Market, and other prominent industry names. All share Seetoh’s vision that street food is about more than nourishment and taste—and it’s about time we start talking about

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A FESTIVUS FOR THE REST OF US

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

NYC Wine & Food Festival to Descend Upon the Big Apple
By Kristen Oliveri

The Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival (www.nycwineandfoodfestival.com), now in its fifth year, kicks off October 11th and might quite possibly be one of the most enticing large scale food-filled events the city that never sleeps has to offer its residents and guests alike.

Running for four informative, delicious and fun packed days this massive food event is lasting presented by the South Beach Wine & Food festival founder, Lee Brian Schrager.

Culinary insiders will enjoy the festival’s 5th anniversary program that features trade-only seminars and the city’s beloved sugar shock indulgence, SWEET – a party hosted by Godiva Chocolatier and Sandra Lee, Friday, October 12 at 82 Mercer in Soho (www.82Mercer.com).

Special events will be ongoing throughout the weekend; most notably one presented by Bank of America, on the Thursday, October 11, On the Chopping Block: A Roast of Anthony Bourdain, hosted by Mario Batali. While guests may be drawn to the sheer opportunity to watch Bourdain get his time to shine in the hot seat, they will also be rewarded with dishes from renowned chef, Michael White.

One of the festival’s more popular events, the Blue Moon Burger Bash hosted by Pat LaFrieda Meats and Rachael Ray, has a new home this year at Manhattan’s Basketball City (Pier 36) on Friday, October 12. Additional celebrity chefs making the rounds at events include Bobby Flay, Giada De Laurentiis, Paula Deen, Guy Fieri, Alton Brown, and Anne Burrell, among others.

While the event is great for consumers and food lovers alike, it’s a not-to-be-missed event for professionals and insiders. It showcases renowned chefs, winemakers, spirit makers and culinary talent, with an exclusive set of events to be held at the International Culinary Center in Soho, featuring master cooking classes, a celebrity chef dinner and tasting/cocktail events.

Hospitality industry PR powerhouse Bullfrog & Baum introduces an industry-only series called Trade Talks. Seats are available (through tradetalks@bullfrogandbaum.com) for those industry folks who want to hear what some colleagues/mentors, and professional crushes like Pat LaFrieda, David Rockwell,

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BRAIN FOOD: “THE MAN WHO CHANGED THE WAY WE EAT”

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

By Thomas McNamee
Story by Mort Hochstein

It was a surprise to me when, recently, I mentioned Craig Claiborne to a knowledgeable friend and he did not recognize the name. In the sixties and seventies, Claiborne dominated the Manhattan food scene and had a nationwide and international influence as restaurant critic and food editor of the New York Times. Quiet and retiring, he was a powerhouse who wrote two dozen books and fathered restaurant criticism as we know it today.

In those years, I produced Claiborne’s appearances on the Today program and occasionally accompanied him when he reviewed restaurants. On one memorable occasion in the mid-sixties, I worked with him as he gave sushi its first major showcase on television. I thought I knew the man. How wrong I was.

A stunning new biography, The Man Who Changed The Way We Eat, portrays Claiborne’s contribution to gastronomy, in the palaces of haute cuisine and in the kitchens of cooks, great and humble. Author Thomas McNamee celebrates the mild mannered Southern gentleman who propelled the food revolution of the last century and we learn almost more than some might care to know about his troubled private life.

McNamee, who also gave us Alice Waters and Chez Panisse, traces Claiborne’s culinary career from his childhood in the kitchen of a renowned Mississippi Delta boarding house where his mother, Miss Kathleen, served the hush puppies and country ham of the region, but also offered sophisticated Creole cuisine which she had learned in New Orleans. He traces another food influence, Claiborne’s navy stint in World War Two, service under fire on the cruiser Augusta in the Mediterranean and eight months based in Morocco and Algeria where he discovered French bistro cooking along with the tagines and spices of North Africa.

After military service, Claiborne studied classical French cuisine and hospitality at the famed Swiss hotel school in Lausanne and returned to the States after two years to begin a campaign that would take him to the New York Times. He worked as a publicist—unhappily-, tended bar and was a receptionist at Gourmet, writing and editing without a byline. He also wrote freelance and his articles brought him in 1957 to the attention of the editor of the Times’ women’s pages, who took a chance on an unseasoned writer, but not before passing him on to Turner Catledge, her managing editor. Catledge, like Claiborne, had attended Mississippi State College and that, Claiborne noted in a memoir, helped clinch the deal.

But nothing happened accidentally with Claiborne. He knew that he’d have to interview with the tough, but folksy editor, and came in ready to play the ‘ol’ boy’ routine with Catledge. The two Mississippians palavered Delta fashion; reminiscing about school days down south and Claiborne was on the first step to inciting a food revolution.

Once on staff, Claiborne slogged his way through assignments, most not related to restaurant reviews. Cannily, when he did review restaurants, he invited senior editors and their wives to join him; on the company, of course. His goal was to make them court him and he dreamed up pleasurable assignments to make research enjoyable. He avoided restaurant reviews as much as possible because

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